February 28, 2017.

It has been almost two months since this new journey began and for the most part, it has been like nothing I have ever experienced before. I have been working since I turned of age to do so without parental consent and if you are familiar with the food production industry, you know those concrete floors and 50 pound bags of flour are more than unforgiving. I do miss the constant activity: the rush of a lunch shift, the rewarding feeling of tired feet, and the sizzle of a fresh, hot meal ready to be served to eager, watering pallets.

The kitchen realm is one focused on time. If you are waiting tables, your tip gets lower with every passing minute. If you are the cook, you have servers starring daggers at you to get that food on a plate. Then there is management, the jack of all trades: Creating menus, recipes, and procedures, training and scheduling multiple staff members, ordering supplies, inventory counts, surprise health inspections, covering shifts for no extra pay, whether you’ve already worked 60 hours that week or not. The worst part? Dealing with your own supervisors. You know the ones…nothing is ever good enough, nothings on time, you’re not doing enough because they can’t see your every move while you’re stuck in that boiling hot, fluorescent, concrete and stainless steel cave. When your every move is scrutinized, you get good (fast) at documenting and reporting, disciplinary action and delegation, time management, and organizing. So good, in fact, that it is engrained in every fiber of your being, making it much harder to adapt to such a laid back environment. Though the world as I knew it before becoming an Appalachian Transition Fellow was high stress and required me to have no life and little relationship with my family, the skills I have developed have been extremely useful in the work I have been able to produce with Appalachian Sustainable Development so far. (Luckily, all of my colleagues here are driven to the MAX!)

Since January 17th, the working groups have begun the decision making and planning process for their 2017 projects, I have met with the Washington County Virginia School Boards Nutrition Director to create a working bond through their backpack program, there have been clear intersections developed between ASD, First Tennessee Development District, and 2nd Harvest Foodbank of Northeast Tennessee through Senior SNAP outreach and the potential VeggieRX program, planned to pilot in Bristol. I have also completed a short side project for Sylvia Crum, the Director of Communications and Development with ASD; a NO FARMS, NO FOOD flyer for our Farm to Table themed events that can be reused throughout the year.There has been more than enough to keep me busy each day and, for the first time in my life, I really look forward to coming to the office every day and to go home without a million pounds of stress and bitterness resting on my shoulders. I am grateful for the opportunity to be a part of the work, that I view through previously hindered eyes, to be larger than life. Though I still have a lot to learn, I am ready and willing to use a newly developed passion and wisdom gained through hard work and constant scrutiny to make a difference in our region, our communities, and our families’ lives. With a clearer mind, rested body, and happiness in my heart, maybe those premature grey hairs will stop sprouting from my 26 year old scalp!

by Jenni Roop